What Can Be Done?

The implications of the Supreme Court decision are unimaginably horrid, as states come up with spurious “evidence” that a voter has moved — “proven” by a failure to respond to a piece of junk mail.

The purge could be massive: A half-million in Ohio will undoubtedly lead to millions nationwide.

Normally, a Supreme Court verdict is the final word, the last rodeo.

But there is hope. On Wednesday, I spoke by phone with renowned ...more

Ohio’s Junk Mail Trick Led The Supreme Court To Approve Jim Crow Vote Purge

Greg Palast for Truthout

Monday’s Supreme Court decision blessing Ohio’s removal of half a million voters was ultimately decided on the issue of a postcard.

Now that little postcard threatens the voting rights of millions — but it can be reversed.

The instant-news media, working from press releases, not the Supreme Court’s decision itself, said that Husted, Ohio Secretary of State v. A. Philip Randolph Institute was about whether Ohio has the right to remove voters who failed to cast ballots in two federal election cycles.

Nope.

Even the Court’s right-wing majority concedes that federal law strictly forbids removing voters because they skipped some elections. The National Voter Registration Act of 1993 states that a voter purge program “shall not result in the removal of the name of any person … by reason of the person’s failure to vote.”

But here’s the trick: ...more

Did The Supreme Court Just Legalize Caging?
The Thom Hartmann Show

Greg Palast 

The Supreme Court's blessing of Ohio's move to remove a half million voters from the rolls because they missed two elections should scare you. But dig this: At least 100,000 of those voters, mostly in Democratic areas, actually only missed one election. Being on the Crosscheck list and not returning a postcard was counted by GOP Secretary of State rules as a "missed" election. ...more

Oil-Can Eddie: The Man Who Made Me an Investigator and Made Me a Man
Eddie Sadlowski (1938-2018)

Greg Palast 

Eddie Sadlowski
[Above: Edward Eugene “Oil-can” Sadlowski,
September 10, 1938 – June 10, 2018.
]

Eddie Sadlowski was a machine oiler at U.S. Steel Southworks. In 1976, he led a workers’ rebellion to take control of the million-person United Steelworkers of America. (Back then, workers were united and America made steel.) Oil-can Eddie was America’s working-class hero, back then, when America was working. He’d been profiled on 60 Minutes. The University of Chicago Business School thought it cute to bring him to the ivy-decorated campus to lecture, with his rough hands and Local 1110 windbreaker, so the yuppies-in-training could make fun of the workers’ monkey trying to speak English.

Sadlowski stunned them, his brain racing beyond them. …more

Court Checks Crosscheck In Indiana

Greg Palast 

A federal judge has enjoined Indiana from purging voters just because they are on Kris Kobach’s Crosscheck list. The winning suit was brought by Common Cause. Their complaint extensively cited the work of the Palast Investigations Fund.

Indiana Preliminary Injunction

[Above: Excerpt from the preliminary injunction which bars Indiana from removing voters from the rolls based on Crosscheck alone. View full order here.]

This means Crosscheck is wounded, but the beast can still kill. Kill democracy. But we are proud to have provided the hard investigative facts that saved tens of thousands of voters of color in Indiana. Just 25 states to go… and we’re going after all of them, one at a time. …more

How RFK Saved MLK’s Life

Greg Palast 
22 June 1963 – Martin Luther King meets with Attorney General, Robert F Kennedy. White House. Credit: Abbie Rowe, National Park Service/JFK Library, Boston”.

50 years ago today, Robert F. Kennedy was assassinated. This is the story of RFK’s profile in political courage, gambling his brother’s election to the Presidency in order to save Martin Luther King Jr. from lynching.

It was a Republican, Martin Luther King Sr., who made John Kennedy president of the United States — for JFK’s saving Daddy King’s son, Martin Jr., from lynching.

This harrowing and little known drama of terror and courage, confirmed for me by Martin Luther King III, changed American politics — and America — forever.

On October 19, 1960, Martin Luther King Jr. was arrested in Georgia for driving with an Alabama driver’s license and sentenced to six months hard labor. No one expected King to survive the sentence — he’d be lynched at the outset.

His father, Martin King Sr., had one desperate chance to save his son. …more